Professional shorthand course in islamabad

1 year ago All Pakistān, Pakistan Ad Views:521 Ad ID: 39530

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  • Ad ID39530
  • Posted On1 year ago
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  • Price15,000 ₨

Description

Shorthand

"Stenography" redirects here. For the process of concealing information in messages, see steganography. For machine stenography, see stenotype.

Shorthand is an abbreviated symbolic writing method that increases speed and brevity of writing as compared to longhand, a more common method of writing a language. The process of writing in shorthand is called stenography, from the Greek stenos (narrow) and graphein (to write). It has also been called brachygraphy, from Greek brachys (short) and tachygraphy, from Greek tachys (swift, speedy), depending on whether compression or speed of writing is the goal.

Many forms of shorthand exist. A typical shorthand system provides symbols or abbreviations for words and common phrases, which can allow someone well-trained in the system to write as quickly as people speak. Abbreviation methods are alphabet-based and use different abbreviating approaches. Many journalists use shorthand writing to quickly take notes at press conferences or other similar scenarios. In the computerized world, several autocomplete programs, standalone or integrated in text editors, based on word lists, also include a shorthand function for frequently used phrases.

Shorthand was used more widely in the past, before the invention of recording and dictation machines. Shorthand was considered an essential part of secretarial training and police work and was useful for journalists. Although the primary use of shorthand has been to record oral dictation or discourse, some systems are used for compact expression. For example, healthcare professionals may use shorthand notes in medical charts and correspondence. Shorthand notes are typically temporary, intended either for immediate use or for later typing, data entry, or (mainly historically) transcription to longhand. Longer term uses do exist, such as encipherment: diaries (like that of Samuel Pepys) are a common example.

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a stenographer, often called a court reporter. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about training, job duties, licensing and the employment outlook to find out if this is the career for you.

Stenographers, sometimes called court reporters, are responsible for court and medical transcription and live broadcast captioning for the deaf and elderly. They use shorthand and a steno machine to transcribe information and commit it to the public record. They train through certificate or associate's degree programs and must be fast and accurate typists. Individuals who work in the court system must be licensed and professionally certified in many states.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts that job growth in this field will be faster than average for all occupations through 2028, with the best opportunities for stenographers trained in Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) or those who can go with clients to medical appointments or public meetings to provide transcription services.

Classical antiquity[edit]

The earliest known indication of shorthand systems is from the Parthenon in Ancient Greece, where a mid-4th century BC marble slab was found. This shows a writing system primarily based on vowels, using certain modifications to indicate consonants.[citation neededHellenistic tachygraphy is reported from the 2nd century BC onwards, though there are indications that it might be older. The oldest datable reference is a contract from Middle Egypt, stating that Oxyrhynchos gives the "semeiographer" Apollonios for two years to be taught shorthand writing. Hellenistic tachygraphy consisted of word stem signs and word ending signs. Over time, many syllabic signs were developed.

In Ancient RomeMarcus Tullius Tiro (103–4 BC), a slave and later a freedman of Cicero, developed the Tironian notes so that he could write down Cicero's speeches. Plutarch (c. 46 – c. 120 AD) in his "Life of Cato the Younger" (95–46 BC) records that Cicero, during a trial of some insurrectionists in the senate, employed several expert rapid writers, whom he had taught to make figures comprising numerous words in a few short strokes, to preserve Cato's speech on this occasion. The Tironian notes consisted of Latin word stem abbreviations (notae) and of word ending abbreviations (titulae). The original Tironian notes consisted of about 4000 signs, but new signs were introduced, so that their number might increase to as many as 13,000. In order to have a less complex writing system, a syllabic shorthand script was sometimes used. After the decline of the Roman Empire, the Tironian notes were no longer used to transcribe speeches, though they were still known and taught, particularly during the Carolingian Renaissance. After the 11th century, however, they were mostly forgotten.

When many monastery libraries were secularized in the course of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation, long-forgotten manuscripts of Tironian notes were rediscovered.

In imperial China, clerks used an abbreviated, highly cursive form of Chinese characters to record court proceedings and criminal confessions. These records were used to create more formal transcripts. One cornerstone of imperial court proceedings was that all confessions had to be acknowledged by the accused's signature, personal seal, or thumbprint, requiring fast writing.[failed verification] Versions of this technique survived in clerical professions into the modern day, and influenced by Western shorthand methods, some new methods were invented.

Our SpeedWriting course is a new way to learn the BakerWrite™ SpeedWriting system in just six hours. It will help you accurately record the spoken word, to speeds over 40 wpm.

Do people still use shorthand in the office? Do I need to learn shorthand? Do bosses still “dictate” letters to their secretaries? These are questions I am often asked by secretarial students, who are debating whether to take the time to learn shorthand as part of their studies. This summary provides every good reason why one should learn shorthand, and how shorthand is used today in the modern business office.

We have to caveat this article by remembering that bosses get paid to be creative, and come up with ideas; they get paid to do the talking. Secretaries, by default, get paid to do the organising and recording – and the recording of information, and then transmitting it accurately from one place to another, is one of the prime responsibilities of a PA or secretary. Shorthand should be the first step in this process, and whilst it is true that many bosses rarely “dictate” letters to their secretaries, one could argue that if they still did, their productivity would be greatly enhanced, because it would save them, the bosses, hours of time sat at their computers, typing their own documentation.

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